Dampened demand and reduced operations mean a lot of idle aircraft on the ground waiting for their next journey, but with the situation worsening that day might take longer than a few months.

The Cathay Pacific Group is currently evaluating their options on fleet management especially in terms of parking aircraft. Currently, their aircraft are parked at their hub in Hong Kong International Airport on taxiways, remote bays and different places at the aerodrome that were made available for parking.

CATHAY PACIFIC’s NETWORK MAP (as at 10-Feb-2020)

CATHAY PACIFIC's NETWORK MAP (as at 10-Feb-2020)

Source: Blue Swan Daily

Singapore Airlines had taken an early call to store some of their aircraft in Alice Springs, Australia. They decided on Alice Springs due to the drier condition that were more suitable for aircraft storage as Singapore like Hong Kong is prone to hot and humid conditions that can cause moisture corrosion on idling aircraft.

An unverified source did mention that the airline would be considering sending 50+ widebodies to drier locations like Australia and Dubai. Australia can be an issue as sources have indicated that certain storage facilities are nearly full as Qantas just announced that they’ll be sending their A380s to the US for storage, so another likely option could be the US to store Cathay’s fleet.

Cathay has stated, the aircraft that would be sent over would also include their other airlines Cathay Dragon and HK Express, this indicates that some narrowbodies would be parked as well.

CATHAY PACIFIC’S LARGEST INTERNATIONAL MARKETS BY COUNTRY (w/c 10-Feb-2020)

CATHAY PACIFIC'S LARGEST INTERNATIONAL MARKETS BY COUNTRY (w/c 10-Feb-2020)

Source: Blue Swan Daily

Sending their aircraft overseas indicates that the airline would not be looking at flying at their full capacity anytime soon, with the aircraft reportedly being widebodies it wouldn’t be a surprise to see some long-haul destinations disappear or served with reduced frequencies till demand picks.

Sources: Cirium, Traveller